Neutral Zone Analysis: 2014-15 season: Game 1 @ Carolina

Game 1 Entries

Above are the results of my neutral zone tracking for the first game of this Islander season.  For quick clarification, “controlled entries” are entries via carry-in or via pass – whereas uncontrolled are by dump or tip-in.  Dump-and-Changes are not counted.  The above is only 5 on 5 play.

The above #s are slightly skewed by score effects: the big lead made the team more willing to play and defend and dump the puck in – entries were 19-17 Isles, 7-5 by controlled entry while the score was still close, before the 2-0 lead.

Again, this is a small sample size so take it for what it’s worth.  Josh Bailey made the most entries, although he started the game with 3 straight dumps.  The new forwards managed 8 carry-ins themselves out of 14 total entries, which is a good rate.  Tavares is usually dominant in entries, but wasn’t last night – course he didn’t need to be.

Overall, a good game, just lacking relevant sample sizes.  We’ll talk more about this as we get more interesting data with larger samples.

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7 thoughts on “Neutral Zone Analysis: 2014-15 season: Game 1 @ Carolina

  1. So, would it be fair to say the the Canes’ higher number of shots per controlled entry is also a score effect? As in, the Isles sat back so much that the Canes could waltz right in and get lots of shots?

    If so, this would be a rather good example of why you should always keep at least a little forechecking going, no?

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    • I’m not actually sure – little research has been done as to score effects on these things, other than it leads to the leading team dumping more. I should look into that.

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      • Ah OK thanks! It just bugs me when teams put zero pressure on the opponent when up by two or so goals. They shouldn’t hang their goalie out to dry. I felt that happened a bit last night.

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    • Successful entries are entries that have a possibility of leading to an offensive zone shot. So a carry in that’s immediately broken up at the line resulting in a clearance isn’t an entry. A dump attempt that doesn’t get past the D and immediately is passed out isn’t an entry.

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    • Any entry which gets the puck in is an entry. Regardless of whether shots come out of it. Failed entries are ones where the puck is never really in the zone, to put it another way

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